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19.03.2013 - FRISCHE x The CollectionsLaura Siegel Fall/Winter 2013By Dixie GongPhotography By Wally SparksThe significance and beauty of Laura Siegel’s designs stem from her commitment to crafting each piece by hand. Knitwear, embroidery, dyeing—even the prints are developed by hand in lieu of the digitally printed clothing so prevalent among young designers now. It naturally follows that ethnic, tribal, and rural-inspired designs are Siegel’s forte. “I always pull from landscapes, nature, and cultures somehow,” she attests. “It’s just what I end up looking into when I go to the library to start researching. My love for nature is always there.” It certainly influenced the visceral colour story. The first eight or so looks were made up of varying shades of burgundy blood red inspired by the idea of a polar bear hunting for fish. The olive and forest greens that ensued manifested out of the image of a grizzly bear in the woods.While last spring’s crochet was replaced with thickly knit oversize scarves and sweaters, the remainder of the collection seemed largely a continuation of her last. As always, draping was key. The clothes moulded to and away from the body with a languid ease while heads were swathed in fringed scarves. Each garment was layered over another, the prints and beadwork clashing in a surfeit of fabric—but as the first look of the presentation would suggest, this was about protection, security, warmth. How to survive in the wild? The first model wore an embroidered shirt evocative of a shell. Her maxi skirt parted to reveal leggings underneath. Socks were tucked into shoes. And of course, an impenetrable, thickly woven scarf concealed her shoulders and neck. True to Siegel’s aesthetic, this was a story about preservation and adaptation.

19.03.2013 - FRISCHE x The Collections
Laura Siegel Fall/Winter 2013

By Dixie Gong
Photography By Wally Sparks

The significance and beauty of Laura Siegel’s designs stem from her commitment to crafting each piece by hand. Knitwear, embroidery, dyeing—even the prints are developed by hand in lieu of the digitally printed clothing so prevalent among young designers now. It naturally follows that ethnic, tribal, and rural-inspired designs are Siegel’s forte. “I always pull from landscapes, nature, and cultures somehow,” she attests. “It’s just what I end up looking into when I go to the library to start researching. My love for nature is always there.” It certainly influenced the visceral colour story. The first eight or so looks were made up of varying shades of burgundy blood red inspired by the idea of a polar bear hunting for fish. The olive and forest greens that ensued manifested out of the image of a grizzly bear in the woods.

While last spring’s crochet was replaced with thickly knit oversize scarves and sweaters, the remainder of the collection seemed largely a continuation of her last. As always, draping was key. The clothes moulded to and away from the body with a languid ease while heads were swathed in fringed scarves. Each garment was layered over another, the prints and beadwork clashing in a surfeit of fabric—but as the first look of the presentation would suggest, this was about protection, security, warmth. How to survive in the wild? The first model wore an embroidered shirt evocative of a shell. Her maxi skirt parted to reveal leggings underneath. Socks were tucked into shoes. And of course, an impenetrable, thickly woven scarf concealed her shoulders and neck. True to Siegel’s aesthetic, this was a story about preservation and adaptation.