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19.03.2013 - FRISCHE x The CollectionsSid Neigum Fall/Winter 2013By Dixie GongPhotography By Wally SparksIt began innocently enough. Sid Neigum opened his collection with the sort of neutral, monochrome looks that first garnered him attention, albeit with far more tailored items than last spring. First, a pearlescent, sharply cut white blazer worn over a sinuous column of a turtleneck dress. Two more all-white outfits followed, both consisting of that same trim polish offset by a knit sweater and, in the case of the third look, a tight maxi skirt with a thigh high slit. This was sexy, grown up, polished. Black and grey pieces made their rounds, all monochrome, all tinged with a gothic air that appropriately straddled the line between trendy and editorial. Then came the prints, a new, very welcome addition to Neigum’s repertoire. “But there are actually no prints in the collection,” he revealed. “All of the print-looking designs are woven into the fabrics”—they’re digital jacquards. Inspired by the floral on floral gems that his sister was outfitted in during their youth in the late 80s/early 90s, the designer modernized the memory: structured shirts and trousers layered under capes all featured a black and white optical illusion check print; the girly, colourful flower print of back then was replaced by a graphic, smoky watercolour version that screamed now; and finally, an abstract painter’s dream of a print in venomous green stole the remainder of the runway. This was the most comprehensive show of The Collections yet. The separates are as wearable as they are stylish, and prove that Neigum is most definitely a designer on the rise. 

19.03.2013 - FRISCHE x The Collections
Sid Neigum Fall/Winter 2013

By Dixie Gong
Photography By Wally Sparks

It began innocently enough. Sid Neigum opened his collection with the sort of neutral, monochrome looks that first garnered him attention, albeit with far more tailored items than last spring. First, a pearlescent, sharply cut white blazer worn over a sinuous column of a turtleneck dress. Two more all-white outfits followed, both consisting of that same trim polish offset by a knit sweater and, in the case of the third look, a tight maxi skirt with a thigh high slit. This was sexy, grown up, polished. Black and grey pieces made their rounds, all monochrome, all tinged with a gothic air that appropriately straddled the line between trendy and editorial.

Then came the prints, a new, very welcome addition to Neigum’s repertoire. “But there are actually no prints in the collection,” he revealed. “All of the print-looking designs are woven into the fabrics”—they’re digital jacquards. Inspired by the floral on floral gems that his sister was outfitted in during their youth in the late 80s/early 90s, the designer modernized the memory: structured shirts and trousers layered under capes all featured a black and white optical illusion check print; the girly, colourful flower print of back then was replaced by a graphic, smoky watercolour version that screamed now; and finally, an abstract painter’s dream of a print in venomous green stole the remainder of the runway. This was the most comprehensive show of The Collections yet. The separates are as wearable as they are stylish, and prove that Neigum is most definitely a designer on the rise.